PARTY

Julius Malema's expulsion upheld - ANC NDCA

Cyril Ramaphosa
24 April 2012

Floyd Shivambu suspended for three years, Sindiso Magaqa one, sanction applies to ANCYL membership as well

PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE NATIONAL DISCIPLINARY COMMITTEE OF APPEAL (NDCA), Chief Albert Luthuli House, Johannesburg, April 24 2012

RE: APPEAL FINDINGS OF COMRADES FLOYD SHIVAMBU, SINDISO MAGAQA AND JULIUS MALEMA

INTRODUCTION

This announcement is being made pursuant to the ANC Constitution which requires that a public announcement of the outcome of the disciplinary proceeding be made.

The Appellants advanced 42 arguments, all of which were dealt with by the NDCA. These findings are contained in a separate 41 page document entitled "NDCA Finding", which will be released publicly as a separate document.

The Appellants' representative and the Secretary General of the ANC were given copies of the NDCA Finding prior to this public announcement.

This public announcement is an extract of the NDCA Finding and sets out the conclusions of some of the NDCA's preliminary rulings and other arguments advanced by the Appellants and the NDCA ruling on the sanctions.

PRELIMINARY RULINGS AND COMMENTS BY THE NDCA

 Withdrawal of Appellant Sindiso Magaqa's appeal

1. The appeal, which was set down for hearing on 12 April 2012, could not be  proceeded with because the Appellants' legal representatives were not  available and the Appellants elected to instruct another legal representative  who needed time to familiar himself with the case.

2. The NDCA postponed the hearing and it was agreed that the parties would file  Heads of Argument and the matter would be decided on the written  submissions.

3. On 18 April 2012, the last day agreed by the parties by which the Appellants  were due to file Heads of Argument, comrade Magaqa's legal representatives  sent a letter to the Chairman of the NDCA which stated the following:-

ANC/SINDISO MAGAQA: WITHDRAWAL OF APPEAL

1. We refer to the Notice of Appeal in respect of the Third Appellant Mr  Sindiso Magaqa ("the Third Appellant") which was lodged with the  NDCA on 14 March 2012.

2. This serves to notify the NDCA that the Third Appellant hereby  withdraws his appeal and no longer persists with the Notice of  Appeal and the ground stated therein.

3. Find herewith the combined heads of argument on behalf of the  remaining appellants, namely, comrade Julius Malema and Floyd  Shivambu.

4. We trust that the above is in order and regret any inconvenience that  may be caused by the withdrawal.

D Mpofu
M Sikhakhane
Representatives of the Appellants
Chambers Sandton
18 April 2012

4. The NDC imposed, as part of its sanction, the condition that cde  Magaqa should make a public apology to cde Malusi Gigaba within 15  days after the NDC pronounced its sanction on 29 February 2012.

5. Cde Magaqa's legal representatives did not furnish any evidence to the NDCA  that the condition in paragraph 4 above has been complied with.

6. Cde Magaqa's legal representatives have also not provided any evidence to the  NDCA that the withdrawal of the appeal was done in agreement with the  Respondent.

7. The fact that cde Magaqa mentioned in his Heads of Argument, filed on 18  April 2012, that he would be withdrawing his appeal is of no consequence.

8. The NDCA is of the view that cde Magaqa was obliged to seek and obtain  the consent of the Respondent to the withdrawal of the appeal especially  in light of the Respondent's argument (in its Heads of Argument filed on  11 April 2012) that the NDC erred on the side of leniency by  suspending cde Magaqa's 3 year sanction.

9. Consequently, the NDCA finds that the unilateral withdrawal of the  appeal would defeat the achievement of justice and be prejudicial to  the Respondent.

10. In the view of the NDCA, the intention of cde Magaqa, in withdrawing  the appeal, was to frustrate the Respondent by precluding it from  arguing for a possible increase in the sanction.

11. The NDCA is of the view that the withdrawal of the appeal at this late  stage, after cde Magaqa and his legal representatives were made aware of  the Respondent's opposition to the NDC's sanction, is an abuse of process.

12. In the NDCA's view, justice must be seen to be done and finality in this  matter should be reached. The unilateral withdrawal of the appeal would  defeat these objectives.

13. In his Notice of Appeal, cde Magaqa argued that the NDCA is entitled to take  into account that in the intervening period he has apologised  unconditionally to Cde Gigaba.

14. The NDCA dismissed cde Magaqa's argument on the following grounds:-

 14.1 Cde Magaqa failed to provide evidence that the condition  imposed by the NDC was complied with;

 14.2 Cde Magaqa's argument that the NDCA was expected to take  into account that an unconditional apology was made to cde Gigaba  (details of which were not provided to the NDCA) demonstrates cde  Magaqa's disregard and disrespect for ANC disciplinary structures  and disciplinary procedures;

14.3 In its letter of withdrawal, cde Magaqa's legal representatives did not  make any reference at all to the public apology nor indicate whether  the withdrawal of the appeal was done in agreement with the  Respondent;

14.4 The Respondent will be prejudiced by the unilateral withdrawal of  the appeal; and

14.5 Finality of this matter and justice will not be achieved by cde  Magaqa's conduct.

15. Consequently, the NDCA, in its discretion and in the interest of justice, has  decided not to allow the withdrawal of cde Magaqa's appeal.

 Nature of ANC disciplinary proceedings

Disciplinary proceedings in the ANC are sui generis in nature and are governed by the ANC Constitution and not by the principles of criminal law and procedure.

Disciplinary proceedings in the ANC should satisfy four requirements, which can be stated as follows:-

 

  • Is there a rule? (In this case, the provisions of Rule 25.5 of  the ANC Constitution which sets out the disciplinary Code of  Conduct)
  • Is the rule reasonable?
  • Was the charged member aware of the rule?
  • Did the charged member contravene the rule?

 

If these requirements are satisfied by cogent evidence and proved on a balance of probabilities, a charged member will be found guilty of contravening the ANC's Code of Conduct as set out in Rule 25.5 of the ANC Constitution.

Unlike in a criminal trial, the Chief National Presenter, or any presenter in ANC disciplinary proceedings, is not required to investigate the state of mind of the charged member when he or she committed the act of misconduct or whether the charged member was provoked into committing the act of misconduct.

Failure by Appellants to accept that they were Found Guilty

After perusing the record, the NDCA is of the view that the Appellants did not  appreciate nor accept the basis upon which they were found guilty.

The NDCA is of the view that the failure by the Appellants and their  representatives to accept that the Appellants were found guilty by a legitimate  structure of the ANC is at the root of the real issue in this appeal proceeding.

 The Appellants' disregard for the rulings of the NDC and NDCA

 The NDCA has noted with concern the Appellants' persistent  claim that:-

 

  • the disciplinary proceedings were instituted to settle political scores;
  • members of the NDC and NDCA were biased; and
  • the proceedings were irregularly conducted by the NDC and the NDCA.

 

The various applications brought by the Appellants in this regard  were considered and dealt with by the NDC and the NDCA (in the first  appeal) and full reasons were provided for their dismissal.

Notwithstanding compliance with due process and fairness by these ANC  structures, the Appellants persist with their claims and have peppered  their Heads of Arguments with innuendos which show a complete  disregard for the rulings of the NDC and the NDCA.

 The Appellants also argued that President Zuma pre-judged the outcome of  these proceedings at a meeting in Port Elizabeth and were prepared to  show a video recording to support their argument. The innuendo in the argument  is that President Zuma controls and influences the NDCA remotely. This  innuendo advanced by the Appellants is devoid of truth and undermines the  integrity of the members of the NDCA. This is rejected.

APPELLANTS' LEGAL ARGUMENTS

The Appellants argued that the NDC committed a fundamental error of justice in relying upon a non-existent version of Article 11.2 of the ANC Youth League Constitution when the applicable version was submitted to the NDC and duly admitted into evidence

The NDCA finds that the appropriate forum for the Appellants to have dealt with the issue of the ANC Youth League Constitution was in the first appeal because the Appellants themselves raised the issue as a ground of appeal in the first appeal to the NDCA.

This would have enabled the Respondent to test the veracity of the latest version of the ANC Youth League Constitution, in particular whether due notice of the proposed amendment was given to the ANC, whether prior notification of the proposed amendment was given to delegates to the ANC Youth League Conference in June 2011 and whether the amendment was properly effected in terms of the ANC Youth League Constitution at the ANC Youth League Conference. Even if it is assumed that the Appellants had presented argument on the latest version of the ANC Youth League Constitution in the first appeal, then, in the view of the NDCA, the current formulation of Article 11.2 would have been rejected because it would have created a legal impossibility and resulted in an accountability free zone for Youth League members and rendered them immune to discipline by the ANC.

Consequently, the NDCA finds that the mere submission in evidence of the latest version of the ANC Youth League Constitution with the amended Article 11.2 at the NDC mitigation hearing, which was dealing with the issue of sanctions, is of no consequence.

In the absence of cogent evidence that the 2011 version of the ANC Youth League Constitution of 2011 is authentic, the NDCA finds that the document is inadmissible in evidence and directs the ANC to investigate this matter.

The NDCA finds that the NDC was entitled to place reliance on the NDCA's finding that "in terms of the articulation between the ANC Constitution and Article 11.2 of the ANC Youth League Constitution, any sanction imposed by the NDC resulting in the imposition of a penalty of suspension or expulsion from the ANC shall be applicable to the Appellant's membership of the ANC Youth League".

 The Appellants argued that the 14 day time limit imposed by the  NDCA was unauthorised, unconstitutional and inherently unfair

There is no requirement in the ANC Constitution for the NDCA to canvass any issue with the parties before making its ruling.

The NDCA publicly announced its Finding on the conviction on 4 February 2012 and the NDC mitigation hearing commenced on 13 February 2012. In the context of a domestic disciplinary hearing, the NDCA is of the view that sufficient opportunity was afforded to the Appellants to make the necessary preparations and commence with the mitigation hearing.

The Appellants argued that the NDC erroneously exceeded the obligatory time limit of 6 months imposed by Rule 25.10 of the ANC Constitution

 The NDCA took cognisance of the fact that the NDC concluded the  disciplinary hearings on 10 November 2011, within the 6 month period  prescribed by Rule 25.10 of the ANC Constitution, when it delivered its  Findings on the convictions and sanctions in respect of the four disciplinary  cases before it. That was a final judgment and concluded the disciplinary  proceedings that were commenced on 19 August 2011. Thereafter the NDC  was functus officio.

The NDCA dismissed the Appellants' argument on the following grounds:-

 

  • Rule 25.10 is intended to place a positive obligation on the ANC to dispose of disciplinary proceedings expeditiously and can only be invoked by a charged member if he or she proves that an ANC disciplinary committee has been dilatory in the execution of its task;
  • The long intervals between sittings of the NDC, primarily due to the non- availability of the Appellants' witnesses and their legal representatives has, in the view of the NDCA, frustrated the achievement and underlying objective of Rule 25.10. After examining the record, the NDCA finds that no fault can be attributed to the NDC for any delays occasioned; and
  • In any event the NDC, out of excessive caution, sought and was granted an extension of time as provided for in Rule 25.10 by the NDCA. This was disclosed to the Appellants at the sitting of the NDCA on 12 April 2012. In seeking such extension, the NDC was not obliged to notify the Appellants as the ANC Constitution does not make notice to the parties a requirement.

 

The Appellants argued that the NDC failed to give them adequate opportunity to be present when the sanction was imposed and imposing the sanction in the absence of the Appellants was an irregularity

In terms of Rule 25.11 of the ANC Constitution the only obligations on a disciplinary committee are to report the outcome of the disciplinary proceeding, in this case, to the Secretary General of the ANC and to publicly announce the decision.

There is no requirement in the ANC Constitution for an ANC disciplinary committee to give any notice to a charged member as to when it would be delivering its Finding or to deliver its Finding in the presence of a charged member.

The Appellants' reliance on Appendix of the ANC Constitution to support its argument is relevant to the time during which disciplinary proceedings are actually conducted because it refers to witnesses and interpreters who are entitled to be present. In the view of the NDCA, this provision is not applicable once the proceedings have been concluded.

If any disciplinary committee of the ANC takes steps to inform the charged member of the date upon which its Finding is to be made or to deliver its Finding in the presence of the charged member, such action would be an act of courtesy on the part of the disciplinary committee concerned and not a requirement in terms of the ANC Constitution.

Appellants argued that the NDC failed to afford the Appellants adequate opportunity to present all their evidence in mitigation The NDCA is of the view that the Appellants had sufficient opportunity to have their witnesses available.

Furthermore, the NDCA is of the view that the Appendix to the ANC Constitution provides for the production of relevant documentation. From the correspondence between the parties, it appears that the Appellants rejected the NDC's offer to present some of the mitigation evidence in affidavit form. The NDCA is of the view that the NDC's offer was not intended to substitute the Appellants' right to call witnesses but to supplement the oral evidence given at the mitigation hearing.

Consequently, the NDCA finds that the Appellants' argument that the NDC failed to afford them adequate opportunity to present all their evidence in mitigation is dismissed.

Appellants argued that the NDC erred in failing to state which portions of the sanctions were related to which separate charge and consequently rendered it impossible for the Appellants to properly exercise their fundamental right of appeal as enshrined in the ANC Constitution

Having considered the arguments of both parties, the NDCA rules as follows:-

 

  • In terms of the Appendix to the ANC Constitution, a  disciplinary committee is required to make a finding based on  the facts and evidence and impose an appropriate sanction  ranging from reprimand to expulsion.
  • The discretion given to a disciplinary committee in terms of  the ANC Constitution is to consider all the convictions  cumulatively and impose an appropriate sanction.
  • Unlike in a criminal trial, there is no obligation on a  disciplinary committee to impose a sanction in respect of  each charge for which a charged member has been found  guilty.
  • The Appellants' argument that the imposition of a single  sanction would be prejudicial and would result in the  duplication of convictions and sanctions is without  substance because a single sanction would not necessarily  result in a duplication of sanctions and cannot possibly  result in a duplication of convictions.
  • Even if it were permissible, the imposition of different  sanctions against a charged member in a disciplinary  hearing would result in the impossibility of deciding which  sanction to enforce. For example, if a charged member is  reprimanded on Charge One and suspended on Charge Two,  there would be uncertainty as to which sanction to enforce.
  • It is for this reason that the ANC Constitution, in the view of  the NDCA, directs a disciplinary committee at the end of the  disciplinary proceedings to discuss the issues raised at the  disciplinary proceedings in private and make a finding based  on the facts and evidence of the case and decide a penalty.

 

Consequently, the Appellants' argument that the NDC's failure to state which portions of the sanctions were related to which separate charge rendered it impossible for the Appellants to properly exercise their fundamental right of appeal as enshrined in the ANC Constitution is dismissed.

Grounds of appeal based on the merits - Appellant Floyd Shivambu

Cde Floyd Shivambu was found guilty on two counts of contravening Rule 25.5 (o) of the ANC Constitution for swearing at a journalist and for issuing, in his capacity as spokesperson of the ANC Youth League, a statement on Botswana in contravention of ANC policy.

The Appellant advanced 8 arguments on the merits, all of which were dismissed by the NDCA and full reasons were provided in the NDCA Finding.

One of the arguments advanced by Appellant Shivambu was that the NDC failed to take into account the personal circumstances of the Appellant, more particularly that he was an employee of the ANC Youth League

The NDCA is of the view that disciplinary action is focused primarily on the contractual relationship between the organisation and the charged member. At the end of the disciplinary hearing a disciplinary committee could retain the membership contract (by reprimanding the member or imposing community service), suspend the contract (for a period of time and subject to conditions) or cancel the contract (by expulsion).

The only criteria for joining the ANC as a new member is that a person must be a South African citizen and at least 18 years old.

In the discharge of its duties, an ANC disciplinary committee is not obliged to consider the personal circumstances of the Appellant and the consequences that disciplinary action would visit upon him in his private life because these factors are not considered when a person joins the ANC and are not relevant to the contractual relationship between the ANC and its members.

The NDCA is satisfied with the approach adopted by the NDC which did not make any finding with regard to the employment contract between the Appellant and the ANC Youth League.

Consequently, the Appellant's argument that the NDC failed to take into account his personal circumstances, more particularly that he was an employee of the ANC Youth League, is dismissed.

Grounds of appeal based on the merits - Appellant Sindiso Magaqa

Cde Sindiso Magaqa was found guilty of contravening Rule 25.5 (o) of the ANC Constitution for issuing, in his capacity as Secretary General of the ANC Youth League, a derogatory and potentially defamatory statement about cde Malusi Gigaba.

The Appellant advanced 7 arguments on the merits, all of which were dismissed by the NDCA and full reasons were provided in the NDCA Finding.

Grounds of appeal on the merits - Appellant Julius Malema

Cde Julius Malema was found guilty of contravening Rule 25.5 (c) and Rule 25.5 (i) of the ANC Constitution for expressing his personal views at a press conference of the ANC Youth League on 31 July 2011 which sought to portray the ANC-led government and the ANC leadership under President Zuma in a negative light in relation to the African Agenda and which had the potential to sow division and disunity in the ANC AND for expressing his personal views on Botswana which contravened ANC policy.

The Appellant advanced 16 arguments on the merits, all of which were dismissed by the NDCA and full reasons were provided in the NDCA Finding.

Two of the arguments advanced by Appellant Malema are the following:-

The Appellant argued that the NDC's erroneous view that the he did not accept the NDC's finding of guilt is irreconcilable with the evidence

The Appellant argued that the NDC's erroneous view that the Appellant did not accept the finding of guilt is irreconcilable with the evidence that he was pleading with the NDC, inter alia:-

 

  • To consider stripping him of his leadership position as the  President of the ANC Youth League and even as PEC member  of the Limpopo Province;
  • To impose a condition for suspension that he should finish  his Political Science degree in record time; and
  • To bar him from holding any leadership positions for a period of time.

 

The NDCA considered the Appellant's evidence as a whole and found it to be contradictory. On the one hand the Appellant was pleading to the NDC not to take away his membership but on the other, he did not show any remorse or respect for the ANC Constitution and its structures.

Having had regard to the Appellant's evidence as a whole, the NDCA is not persuaded by the sincerity of the Appellant's plea. The NDCA confirms the NDC's finding that the Appellant did not accept his finding of guilt and was not capable of rehabilitation.

Consequently, the Appellant's argument that the NDC's erroneous view that the he did not accept the NDC's finding of guilt is irreconcilable with the evidence is dismissed.

The Appellant argued that the NDC erred in failing to appreciate the conceptual difference between not respecting the disciplinary processes of the NDC and the NDCA and contesting the contents of their outcomes

The Appellant argued that the NDC wrongly equated these two unrelated concepts and thereby came to the wrong conclusion that the Appellant did not respect the ANC Constitution despite evidence to the contrary.

The Appellant also argued that the NDC ought to have found that, given the possibility of the decision of the NDCA being overturned by the NEC or the National Conference, which are the highest decision making bodies in the ANC (i.e. higher than the NDC/NDCA), then the Appellant is quite entitled to continue contesting the correctness of the decisions of the lower structures.

The NDCA finds as follows:-

 

  • The Appellant's understanding of the ANC Constitution is  fundamentally flawed;
  • The NDC, NDCA, NEC and National Conference are not in a  hierarchical relationship as argued by the Appellant;
  • The NDC and NDCA are structures appointed by the NEC to  perform a duty on behalf of the ANC relating to discipline;
  • The National Conference is the supreme ruling and  controlling body of the ANC which is comprised of delegates  elected by branches of the ANC and representation from the  Provincial Executive Committees, the ANC Veterans League,  the ANC Youth League and the ANC Women's League. The  National Conference meets once every five years.
  • The NEC is the highest organ of the ANC between national  conferences and has the authority to lead the organisation,  subject to the provisions of the ANC Constitution.
  • According to the ANC Constitution, decisions of the NDCA are  final.
  • The NEC may, in its discretion, review a decision of the  NDCA. The NEC's power of review does not encompass a  further appeal, as argued by the Appellant, but affords the  NEC an opportunity to review decisions of the NDCA to satisfy itself that natural justice has been afforded to a  charged member.

 

By virtue of the Appellant's flawed understanding of the ANC Constitution, the NDCA further finds that the Appellant's argument of a conceptual difference between not respecting the disciplinary processes of the NDC and the NDCA and contesting the contents of their outcomes is misplaced.

The NDCA has not found any evidence to the contrary, as argued by the Appellant, which would have persuaded it to come to a different conclusion to that of the NDC.

Consequently, the Appellant's argument that the NDC erred in failing to appreciate the conceptual difference between not respecting the disciplinary processes of the NDC and the NDCA and contesting the contents of their outcomes is dismissed.

NDCA RULING

Having considered the grounds of appeal and the Heads of Argument, the NDCA rules as follows:-

APPEAL OF FLOYD SHIVAMBU

1. The appeal is dismissed.

2. The Respondent's argument that the sanction of the Appellant be increased to a suspension of 5 years was considered by the NDCA and  rejected.

3. The sanction imposed by the NDC that the Appellant's ANC membership  be suspended for a period of 3 years is confirmed.

4. This sanction is applicable to the Appellant's membership of the ANC  Youth League.

APPEAL OF SINDISO MAGAQA

1. The appeal is dismissed.

2. Having had regard to all the circumstances concerning this appeal, the  NDCA, in the exercise of its discretion, varies the sanction imposed by the  NDC as follows:-

"The Appellant's ANC membership is suspended for a period of 1 year,  which shall come into operation with immediate effect".

3. This sanction is applicable to the Appellant's membership of the ANC Youth League.

 4. Consequently, cde Sindiso Magaqa shall vacate his position as Secretary General of the ANC Youth League.

APPEAL OF JULIUS MALEMA

1. The appeal is dismissed.

2. With regard to the Appellant's disciplinary hearing held in May 2010, the  sanction imposed by the NDC that the Appellant's ANC membership be  suspended for a period of 2 years is confirmed.

3. In respect of the present disciplinary hearing, the NDCA confirms the  sanction imposed by the NDC that the Appellant be expelled from the ANC.

4. These sanctions are applicable to the Appellant's membership of the ANC Youth League.

Dated at Johannesburg this 24th day of April 2012

CYRIL RAMAPHOSA
CHAIRMAN
ANC NATIONAL DISCIPLINARY COMMITTEE OF APPEAL

JEFF RADEBE
MEMBER
ANC NATIONAL DISCIPLINARY COMMITTEE OF APPEAL

JESSIE DUARTE
MEMBER
ANC NATIONAL DISCIPLINARY COMMITTEE OF APPEAL

TREVOR MANUEL
MEMBER
ANC NATIONAL DISCIPLINARY COMMITTEE OF APPEAL

BRIGITTE MABANDLA
MEMBER
ANC NATIONAL DISCIPLINARY COMMITTEE OF APPEAL

Issued by the ANC NDCA, April 24 2012

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Comments

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 responses to this article

MALEMA IS FINISHED
whoohoo
this must be a lesson to arrogant youth league mambers

by Bra007 on April 24 2012, 22:36
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In short...,
The hearing WAS rigged, just like Jacob 783's.
The fat boy who was once prepared to die for Zuma is now, ANC-wise, dead.

Malema helped get a corrupt Machiavellian into power (and used his methods himself). Now he is paying the . .more

by Loudly South African on April 24 2012, 22:47
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HE COULDNT HEED HIS OWN ADVICE
He once said, 'in politics there are no permanent enemies, and no permanent friends'. Yes, now his former friends are sworn foes ensuring he is dead and buried once and for all. Is there any hope that ANC politics will normalise now? I dont know!

by Aubrey Maphuti on April 24 2012, 23:28
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Expulsion of Leadership and dissolving of the ANCYL
What a pity ! What short-sightedness these 3 will always be respected by their followers.This is not about personal feelings and narrow-mindedness.These young men should have been given a chance by showing them what is expected of them by the mother . .more

by Bonnie on April 25 2012, 03:31
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MALEMA'S EXPULSION FROM ANC
Malema was used by people who did not his sudden rise to power. He thought they were making him a hero not knowing that they were sinking him. We do not blame him but his academic level. When I saw him wearing a ZANU PF t-shirt with Mugabe's face, I . .more

by Relato Discipline Mokwena on April 25 2012, 05:25
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One down
More to go.
The basket is still full of rotten apples.
For now it's dog eats dog hopefully that should bring the numbers down. But in no way is the fight against corruption over.

by Jzee on April 25 2012, 06:10
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Misplaced effort, and disrespect to South Africa
If only the ANC put as much effort into weeding out crime (including corruption) and incompetence in its executive and in the government as in considering every detail and nuance of the validity of expelling scoundrels in its structure South Africa would . .more

by Dinks on April 25 2012, 06:30
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Malema
"The man that took South Africans for a ride"

by Wizard on April 25 2012, 06:51
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Bye Bye - Red Card
This red card was way overdue - let's be honest , this is an uncouth lout , overly engrossed with his own self importance . He shoiuld have copped a flatty moons ago or simply been F***** up . Good riddance .

What worries me though is the . .more

by Green Room on April 25 2012, 07:19
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what's up
I* = Intelligence Quota - why is that blocked above

by Green Room on April 25 2012, 07:24
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malema die for yourself
am sure we will rest in Limpopo with JuJu boys and Lesiba Gwangwa

by mashudu on April 25 2012, 07:46
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Forced to be evil
This is scaring a good number of would be anarchists. He is now free to talk his mind outside the ANC. The same fate that befell Mbeki will fall on Zuma should Malema bounce back.This fear forcess Zuma to press even harder to elimininate his chances of . .more

by Zondo on April 25 2012, 08:39
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The grief of the people

What I am hearing from the ground is a sense of deep grief from the many many people who believe that he is their only hope out of poverty.

What astonishes me is that neither talk radio or TV have gone in depth to explain to the people the . .more

by DM on April 25 2012, 08:52
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correction

We do not have the capacity in terms of Electricity, Water, Engineers, Railways etc

by DM on April 25 2012, 08:54
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Malema"s expulsion
I am not shock with the decisoin of the NDCA everyone one was expecting that pronouncement I don't even think they look at the Head of Arguments filed by the legal representative bcz the case was decided behind closed doors. what worries me is that the . .more

by mjiza on April 25 2012, 08:56
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Malema's expulsion
I am worried by the poor analysis of Malema's expulsion by some in youth circles. He was expelled for contravening sections of ANC constitution and NOT for talking about economic freedom Please do NOT LIE to the people

by Gadlaza on April 25 2012, 09:04
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POLITICAL LIES
Malema has been expelled because CYRIL, ZUMA & HANEKOM wants to please their bosses. white Mentality.SA will not be at peace. LIARS. Sell-outs.

by Riet Manuel on April 25 2012, 09:25
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Power wars
Nothing, but nothing is permanent in politics, especially in Africa.
The fat Pedi boy will definitely come back with a vengeance.
Well, except if someone makes him an offer he can't refuse, as they did with Lumumba, Zulu, Hani...
The Inguni . .more

by Injala Apera on April 25 2012, 09:39
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@Green Room
the abbreviation for Intelligence Quotient is obviously automatically edited out by Politicsweb's system. Possibly because the abbreviation might be used by posters to denigrate the intellectual value of those they argue against, why that is a problem is . .more

by Anthony Caenazzo on April 25 2012, 09:45
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where is NDC & NDCA credibility?
The NDC&NDCA has lost its credibility. The whole disciplinary processes were a farce! The disciplinary structures of the ANC have proved to be heavily politically influenced. They couldn't disperse justice objectively in this case. Its a sham!!!

by Cuz on April 25 2012, 09:52
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Malema
The end of Malema in the ANC was inevitable. No organization can tolerate an undermining individual with his or her own agenda being contrary to the party. What we need now is for the Press to banish Malema with no more coverage. However, his apparent . .more

by THINKER on April 25 2012, 10:12
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by Anthony Caenazzo
P@thetic

by Injala Apera on April 25 2012, 10:13
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amen
amen twith juju, he got what he deserves. there should be no more comments about him ,he does not exist.

AMEN

by nomathemba madyo on April 25 2012, 10:58
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amen
amen with juju, he got what he deserve, there should be nocomments about him, he does not exist.

AMEN

by nomathemba madyo on April 25 2012, 11:00
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@Anthony Caenazzo
I think the work is "P*******" - "P a t h e t i c" let's see if I'm correct.

by Dinks on April 25 2012, 11:26
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Youth-Brigadier-MALEMA.....

.....was deployed by his true masters for a purpose, with ultimate instruction & resourcing from Harare.

UNLESS I am missing a point here, I fail to see that "mission accomplished" ?

THEREFORE, watch this Youth Brigadier career . .more

by John Austin on April 25 2012, 11:44
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Amandla
SARS, NPA & Public protector will be used to pacify him
"@khayadlanga:Malema may be more dangerous to Zuma
now that he is outside the ANC."

by ANCYLREVOL on April 25 2012, 11:57
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Live by the sord die by the sord
Malema contributed to the breakawy of Cope. Some members left or despised the ANC. Now he must taste his own medicine. Big T must be laughing and enjoying his pipe.

by TnT on April 25 2012, 15:12
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@Injala Apera and Dinks
Thanks for the solution, it has bugged me for months.
But I still can't see why it needs to be edited out since it is a very mild term to describe the posts of some Politicsweb readers.
If somebody responded to one of my posts and use that word I . .more

by Anthony Caenazzo on April 25 2012, 15:27
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@Injala Apera and Dinks
Obviously we can use any word we want as long as we convert a single letter in the word or put the word in inverted commas. The members of the old censorship board, headed by Braam Coetzee under our original criminally minded government, would need to . .more

by Anthony Caenazzo on April 25 2012, 15:46
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sh*t
now they are gowing for his sidekicks, the real vandals, S*** is gonna fly

by Makofane on April 25 2012, 15:52
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The ghost of Malema past...
The political future of Malema is like the future of Winnie Mandela...there isn't one...no influence, no tenders, no friends...anyone who decides to bankroll him for an independent political comeback is on a hiding to nothing...maybe he will go PAC...

by . on April 25 2012, 19:25
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SO WHAT
ONE DAY IS ONE DAY UL VACATE THOSE POSITIONS AND THE YOUTH LEAGUE WILL RULE THIS ANC N COUNTRY

by SO WHAT on April 25 2012, 19:51
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@Dot....

.....now then, your suggestion of going PAC certainly DOES make sense.

The PAC and ZANU always were a match made in liberation movement heaven.

ChikurubiZizoReVanhu

by John Austin on April 25 2012, 20:50
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most of you have got it 100% wrong
malema is of no importance.
The supply of Che guevara funny hats and tin badges is enormous; any wannabe third rate movie star can wear one .
What is of importance though is the machinery or methodology whereby the cadre ilks create their own . .more

by Plutarch on April 25 2012, 21:14
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I feel sorry for Malema
He announced on a Friday "Thabo Mbeki will be recalled... we want his membership card to be taken away". Isn't it ironic that he is now the one losing his membership card from the people he was prepared to kill for? Under Mbeki, this young man would have . .more

by Lwi on April 26 2012, 08:46
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Question
If the NDC can expel an elected official, does this mean that they could in effect expel the president of the ANC himself in a same way as the YL president. Would it not have to go to the NEC before charges are preferred?

by Badd on April 26 2012, 18:49
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EISH
THE NDC CAN SUSPEND JUJU BUT THE MIND AND IDEAS WNT BE EXPELLED.

by NANA on May 04 2012, 11:52
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JUJU' IS POISONOUS IN THE COUNTRY
JULIUS MALEMA MUST GO N SEEK FOR A JOB OPPORTUNITY AT MARIKANA AND WORK AS MINER MAYBE HIS MIND WILL BE MADE UP, IT SEEMS AS IF HE IS DRUGGED

by JUJU'S COUSIN NWABISA@ EMANYISENI on October 05 2012, 14:10
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