PARTY

How we can rekindle the South African dream - Mamphela Ramphele

Mamphela Ramphele
18 February 2013

Text of businesswoman's speech on launch of the party political platform, Agang

Text of speech by Mamphela Ramphele on the launch of a party political platform for all South Africans, Women's Gaol,  Constitution Hill, Johannesburg, February 18 2013

REKINDLING THE SOUTH AFRICAN DREAM

Fellow South African citizens, I am here today to invite you to join me on a journey to build the country of our dreams. I ask those of you of my generation: let us cast our minds back to the run up to 1994 and the moments immediately following the dawn of our freedom. Do you remember our patience and quiet dignity as we waited in long queues to cast our very first votes as citizens of a free South Africa? Do you remember how you choked with emotion and had goose bumps as you made your very first cross on the ballot? Do you remember the tears of joy and relief when we watched our first President, Rolihlahla Mandela, being honoured with a fly-past by the air-force that was to have its first democratically elected commander in chief? Do you remember how Madiba inspired us to action in these words of his inaugural address?

"Our daily deeds as ordinary South Africans must produce an actual South African reality that will reinforce humanity's belief in justice, strengthen its confidence in the nobility of the human soul and sustain all our hopes for a glorious life for all."

Do you remember the dream we embraced to build ours into a great society - a prosperous constitutional democracy united in its diversity? Do you remember our commitment to promote human dignity (Ubuntu) and banish humiliation and disrespect of our apartheid past? Do you remember our vow to promote transparency and accountability in public life? Do you remember that we agreed that our democracy would be known for being responsive to the social and economic needs of all citizens? Do you remember?

As a daughter of Limpopo, a rural province, and an adopted resident of the Eastern Cape, another rural province, I have seen both the high points and low points of our imagined future. I have had to overcome the high barriers to opportunity confronting many black people, especially black rural women, to become a student activist, a medical doctor, a community development activist, a researcher, a university executive, a global public servant at the World Bank and now an active citizen in both the public and private sectors. Key to my success is the support and encouragement I received from my family, my teachers, my friends and fellow citizens. My journey is the journey of a searcher who never gives up dreaming of a better tomorrow.

The country of our dreams has unfortunately faded for many of my fellow South Africans. The dream has faded for my sisters and brothers in rural areas who live under the threat of being again made subjects of traditional chiefs and other unelected traditional leaders through proposed acts of our own Parliament. The dream has faded for the many living in poverty and destitution in our increasingly unequal society. And perhaps worst of all, my generation has to confess to the young people of our country: we have failed you. We have failed to build for you an education and training system to prepare you for life in the 21st century. As a result the dream has faded for young people in both urban and rural areas.

I am here today to invite you, young and old, to re-imagine the country of our dreams and to commit to building it into a reality in the lives of every South African. I have said that I am no messiah. No single individual acting on their own can build our nation into the country of our dreams. But I am willing to be a bridge between my generation - those of us who fought for freedom who remember not only with their minds but also with their hearts - and that of my children. For us the dream remains alive as a link between those who sacrificed their lives for freedom to be born and those who live in the hope of seeing the reality of the dream come alive in their own life time.

Today I announce that I am working with a group of fellow citizens to form a party political platform that will focus on rekindling hope that building the country of our dreams is possible in our lifetime. Our consultations and conversations across the lengths and breadths of our country have confirmed a hunger for a new beginning. Young and old, poor and rich, men and women, urban and rural people are yearning for a political platform that can put our country first. A platform that will be open to all South Africans of good will who want to build the country of our dreams. This will be a platform that will capture the best in us and enable us to transcend our divided past and work together as a society united in our diversity. It is a platform that will seek to work with others to reduce the fragmentation in the political landscape and to realign politics towards a focus on putting the country first. We launch this initiative under the name Agang, or in the Nguni languages of our country, Akhani, which can be interpreted in English as "Build South Africa".

The decision to enter party politics has not come easily. I have never been a member of a political party nor aspired to political office. I however feel called to lead the efforts of many South Africans who increasingly fear that we are missing too many opportunities to become that which we have the potential to become - a great society. I have no illusions about the difficult road ahead. Bridges get trampled on. But I trust my fellow South Africans' capacity to come together at critical times to do what others believe is impossible. I believe in our potential for greatness. I believe that greatness is within our grasp if only we can reach out across divisions and self-interests and put the country first.

Our country is at risk because self-interest has become the driver of many of those in positions of authority who should be focussed on serving the public. The great society to which we committed ourselves following our relatively peaceful political transition is rapidly unraveling before our eyes. The impressive achievements of the past eighteen years are being undermined by poor governance at all levels of society. An unchecked culture of impunity and the abuse of power as well as public resources rob children, young people, rural and urban poor people of the fruits of freedom.

Corruption, nepotism and patronage have become the hallmarks of the conduct of many in public service. Corruption is theft. It steals textbooks from our school children. It steals drugs from sick people. It steals social grants from old people and poor children. It robs citizens of hope and destroys dreams. This party political platform will declare war on corruption. It will work with all those in civil society as well as individual citizens and dedicated public servants who share our concerns to fight this scourge.

Why has the Dream Faded and What Can We Do Now?

Mind-set Change from Subjects to Citizens

We have seriously under-estimated what it would take to walk the journey from being subjects of undemocratic governments, denied the right to make our own choices, to become citizens of a constitutional democracy, reclaiming control over our lives. We did not stop and take the time at the beginning of our journey in 1994 to work on shifting our mind-sets from those of compliant subjects to those of dignified citizens. It is not surprising that despair and hopelessness is driving many decent people to violence in both the domestic and public spaces. The majority of citizens feel excluded and disrespected at all levels of their daily lives. Violence is the weapon of those who feel powerless. The risks to the enormous potential for a great future are becoming obvious to even the most optimistic amongst us.

We have not invested adequately in educating for democracy. Civic education, a cornerstone of all thriving democracies, is absent in our homes, schools, places of worship, work places and communities. Citizens must be given the opportunity to share in supportive conversations about the fears and insecurities that make them prisoners of the past. The most troubling example of our failure to shift our mindsets and take ownership of our country is that less than 10% of South Africans - young and old - self-identify as South Africans first.

Ethnicity, religion and economic class come first to mind for the majority of citizens. How can we build the country of our dreams if we do not identify intimately with it and make it what defines us? How can we build a country united in its diversity if we do not put the country first in our souls and hearts?

We must build a sense of common South African citizenship. We must promote healing circles across the lengths and breadths of our society to free our souls from the fear of the unknown and dependencies on authority figures that undermine our ability to shape our future with confidence. We will work with those in civil society who are drafting a Citizen Charter to help guide us on our journey to the country of our dreams.

Empowering the People to Govern

Our society's greatness is being fundamentally undermined by a massive failure of governance. Our rallying cry during the struggle for freedom was for the people to govern, yet the system of choosing Members of Parliament from lists drawn up by political parties gives disproportionate power to party bosses at the expense of ordinary citizens. We should be able to vote for the person in our own area we want to represent us in Parliament, so we can hold them accountable for the electoral promises they make.

 We want an MP for Marikana, an MP for De Doorns, and an MP for Sasolburg, so if the people are unhappy and the MP is not responsive enough, they will be voted out at the next election. South Africa's people are effectively being prevented from governing by the country's electoral system. We will be working with fellow citizens to launch a million signature campaign for electoral reform. Electoral reform must be the first order of business of the post-2014 election parliament.

Governance failure is also reflected in the manner in which powerful vested interests have undermined key decision making and proper management of assets of the state. This is reflected by the seamless manner in which the party, the government, the president and the state have merged into a monolith of impunity.

The ANC's Chancellor House investment arm represents the most blatant example of how the governing party has abused the state to benefit its loyalists and to sustain itself in power. The most troubling aspect of Chancellor House investments is the lack of transparency of its deals. What we do know is that the participation of Chancellor House as a BEE partner of Hitachi, a supplier of Eskom's Medupi Power Station, makes a mockery of the ANC's claim to accountable and transparent governance. Poor people are the biggest losers as a result of the unholy business-government alliances designed to aggressively pursue commercial interests for political elites.

Workers and poor people are also the victims of the interests of privileged union leaders becoming too closely tied to those of government. We will defend the right of workers to unionize and protect their rights at all times. We also work to enable unions and other worker representatives to participate fully in the promotion of opportunities for workers to be trained and enjoy modern quality of life benefits.

The distance that has developed between workers and union leaders undermines not only good labour relations but also productivity that comes from job satisfaction and a sense of fulfillment by all workers. Our platform will promote full engagement of workers in shaping a prosperous society for all, and the strengthening of the role of government in serving all citizens equally.

Building a Competent Public Service

The poor performance of our public service is a major obstacle to providing citizens with quality public services. Lack of competence in public service seriously undermines competitiveness, economic growth, job creation and the general improvement of living standards in South Africa. Our failure to create a competent, professional and non-partisan public service undermines the quality of governance at all levels. Public service failures and corruption hurt poor people most.

We are committed to establishing a competent, performance managed and professional state bureaucracy that serves the public. Co-ordination and collaboration must be at the heart of the culture of public service to ensure efficiency and effectiveness at all levels of government. Public service must become a desirable career option for committed patriots.

South Africa has the necessary depth of expertise and experience to run a modern democracy. We need to depoliticize the public service beyond agreed levels where political deployment of competent dedicated professionals is desirable. We are determined to promote the development of technical and specialist professional skills among public servants, improving relations between national, provincial and local government. We do have good and competent public servants who try their best to serve with integrity. But too many of us are not treated with the dignity we expect and deserve. We need to build a humane, caring public service.

Building a Restructured Economy

Our nation's progress is hampered by an economy that does not work for every South African. There is no justification for so much poverty in the midst of so much opulence in our society. The tragic events at Marikana and the revolt by farm workers in the Western Cape Boland area have underscored the urgent need for restructuring the foundations of our economy. The legacy of the exclusionary economic and political systems that continue to characterise the primary sectors of mining and agriculture undermines our present and future economic prospects.

It is appalling to learn that an estimated 71 percent of South Africans in the 15-34 age group who make up 60 percent of our population, are not participating in the economy, and are instead forced to accept the humiliating substitute of social grants. How can we build the country of our dreams when the most energetic and innovative segment of the population is unable to participate in the economy of their own country?

We have failed to transform our economy to become one that gives everyone opportunities to live in dignity as contributors to building our country. We must create an environment that creates incentives for job creation and opportunities for livelihoods for all. The mining sector's business model based on reliance on the migrant labour system and large numbers of low-cost, low-skilled labour is unsustainable.

The mining and agricultural industries have to migrate to a business model that invests in skills of its workers, uses innovative technologies to remain competitive and create new type of jobs and opportunities for all. Another important test for our country is how to improve the skills of the rapidly increasing pool of unskilled and semi-skilled labour to give them jobs in an economy that is dominated by the services sector. We have to become much more focused on productivity and competitiveness in our areas of strength and become a desirable investment destination and supplier of choice internationally.

Building Education and Training Systems for the 21 st century

The alarming collapse of education in our public schools represents a grave threat to our future. It is woeful, shameful that we should have such low expectations of young South Africans that we are prepared to accept thirty percent as a pass mark for school leavers. What nation can expect to succeed in the 21st century with such low levels of standards of education?

Restructuring our economy to meet today's challenges requires a concerted focus on turning around the public education and training system that is failing the majority of young South Africans. The fight against poverty and inequality cannot be won without radical transformation of our education and training system into one that promotes and rewards excellence at all levels. Teaching should once again become a proud profession for all teachers who are entrusted with the future of our children. Investment in adequate infrastructure including access to information technology teaching and learning support should be the entitlement of every child and teacher. Our children deserve better. Our teachers deserve better.

The time has come for us to work together to establish an education and training system that re-ignites the self-confidence and hopes of young South Africans to be part of the shaping of the country of our dreams. This requires a bold national leadership that can unite South Africans in the promotion of excellent education for all citizens. Ours must be a society in which every child matters and their talents are nurtured to enable them to become the best that they can be.

Raising South Africa's Standing in the World.

Our country has lost the moral authority and international respect it enjoyed when it became a democracy. This has largely to do with our failure to understand the complexity of formulating foreign policy positions in our inter-connected world. We have also not utilized the expertise that resides amongst South Africans of goodwill beyond those in government. The most serious flaw in our foreign policy stances is our failure to consistently align our policies with the human rights principles of our Constitution. We have taken positions in the multilateral arena in recent years on vexed issues such as Zimbabwe, Darfur and Myanmar that are at variance with our human rights principles.

South Africa's global standing has also been diminished by the surrender of our country's national sovereignty to appease foreign powers such as China, as the case of the Dalai Lama's unsuccessful visa application to visit our shores showed. Moreover, South Africa's international influence has been undercut by a foreign policy that has failed to define a coherent strategy for our country's external engagements.

We need to provide greater clarity on our foreign policy objectives and ensure that these are in tune with our economic diplomacy efforts. The structural shifts in the global economy - reflected in the rapid rise of developing and emerging economies and a redirection of trade and investment towards Asia, Latin America and Africa - present our country with abundant opportunities to advance its national economic interests.

We have not exploited these opportunities adequately. We have also not sufficiently used our strong position as an African country to provide leadership, especially on regional integration processes, and to forge strong mutually beneficial relationships in a continent that is set to outperform others in a struggling global economy.

The lack of a strategic approach to migration and our failure to articulate policies that attract and retain skills for our competitiveness has left us in a situation where we have the worst of all sides of migration. Our failure to protect our borders has created a huge burden of uncontrolled economic and political refugees. This burden has generated a virulent xenophobic response from poor people who are forced to compete with much more determined migrants and refugees. We should be the magnet for Africa's most talented skilled people and be able to respond systematically to deserving political refugees.

Restoring our country's standing in the global arena and articulating a clear strategy for international political, diplomatic and economic engagements, in an increasingly complex global environment, must become an overarching priority of our foreign policy.

Rekindling the dream

We are here to invite people of my generation to rekindle the South Africa of our dreams. We are here to invite people of my sons' generation to experience for themselves the thrill of living in an age of excitement and possibility. We are here to mobilize to build a world-beating 21st century democracy. We are here to invite you all to rediscover and live the values that made us a great nation. We are here to make sure that Ubuntu becomes again a way of life and ensure that every South African feels valued because they are human. We are here to ensure that being human must again become the most important status. We are here to invite all citizens to help turn our country away from the road to ruin that it seems to be set on.

We have been here before. We managed to pull ourselves from the brink of disaster before and surprised those who under-estimated our resolve as a people. The political party platform we are working on forming is an opportunity for all citizens to join hands in shaping it to ensure that it responds to the yearnings of citizens who have largely stood on the sidelines for lack of an appropriate political home. This is an opportunity for citizens to take ownership of their own country's destiny and shape it. We need to have the courage of our convictions and not let fear imprison us.

I invite all compatriots to work with us to build a South Africa we can all be proud of. We owe it to you, our children, and your children to leave them a legacy of a great country. I have put up my hand. I ask you all to join this effort. Our children and grandchildren deserve nothing less. Our mothers and grandmothers deserve nothing less. All South Africans deserve nothing less.

Thank you.

Mamphela Ramphele

18/2/2013

Issued by Agang South Africa, February 18 2013

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Comments

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 responses to this article

bear-baiting
Will be interesting to see how the deployed ANC cadres start howling at the moon on this development.
The character assassins will be out in full force.
I can just see the furry little skukn Mantashe drawing himself up to his full height of 4 ft . .more

by Pangolin on February 18 2013, 11:46
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Who Cares
Just another parasite ~!

by Pleb on February 18 2013, 11:59
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We need to built a competent public Service...
Does this mean that AA will stop immidiatly and recruitment and job promotions will happen only on merit - irrespective of colour ?

by Walter on February 18 2013, 12:12
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Hope?
Can we hope that this lady can deliver us from evil?

by Moor on February 18 2013, 12:33
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The first paragraph
Here's a problem: The majority of South Africans did not vote in the 1994 elections; trying to tug at non-existent heart strings is not going to work. The rest of this is just too long; I don't have time for it. Gotta make a living.

by South One on February 18 2013, 12:58
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So far, so good
An impressive speech and agenda. Now to see where it takes us. Remember it has just made as many enemies as friends.

by Paul Whelan on February 18 2013, 13:07
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Dr Rampele
Most ppl on Facebook are saying she's an Opportunist. They are not going anywhere.

by LOL on February 18 2013, 13:10
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Pie-in-the-Sky and Ubuntu the magical black flying unicorn
Because let's face it, anybody that invokes Ubuntu is deluded beyond reason. Politicians are talented showmen and liars, and Ramphele should've probably surrounded herself with figures of prominence for her badly named party to carry more weight. A missed . .more

by Stephan on February 18 2013, 13:26
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Good news, the White Party can now be exposed! Black should not vote Apartheid parties, NEVER!
The Apartheid Hyaena in a sheep skin is recruiting COCONUTS like Mazibuko so that it can quietly bring back CRIME AGAINST HUMANITY.

by Mageza We Skepe(KNMD) on February 18 2013, 13:49
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At last we have an alternative to the Desperate Alliance
If the ANC was not your bundle then one tended to vote DA. There is no future for the DA in South Africa, they are too white, too old school, too arrogant, have a coconut in Parliament as a leader and they did take money, so we are told by the press as . .more

by Norman on February 18 2013, 13:53
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ZIlle and Zuma comparable ???
@Norman, your annoyance with the DA notwithstanding (and I have always regarded the derogatory term "coconut" as applied by someone with an obvious inferiority complex due to failed education), Zille may criticize the big fat Zulu chief as much as she . .more

by BeMoaner on February 18 2013, 14:02
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@Norman
Go away, troll!

by Merlin on February 18 2013, 14:03
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anyone but anc
sick and tired of anc arrogance and corruption. Mamphele, we wish you well on your nu career and asssure u of our utmost backing, support and prayers to the Holy one, in all our earnestness; and if necessary, accompanied by fasting for 40 days for those . .more

by Aganang on February 18 2013, 14:36
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correction
golden calf, sinning utterly against the Holy one.

by Aganang on February 18 2013, 14:39
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Still keeping on topic as usual, Lyndall?
How about you confine all your thoughts to just *one* instance so we don't skip through several at a time?

by David on February 18 2013, 15:04
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Responding to Aganang
@ David (Bullard?)

by Lyndall Beddy on February 18 2013, 15:08
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Eiiiish Lyndull
Your father did not by any chance taught or knew some of the relatives of Mamphele?

You just dont know when to stop.

by A gangster on February 18 2013, 15:19
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@ Lyndall Beddy
Put a sock in it! You are like a stuck record that just goes on and on and on

by Flicka Goslett on February 18 2013, 15:22
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an inauspcious start to a vanity project
If you want to get your ideas across then you had better design a short version because your message is hopelessly lost in all the words.

For a start give us a 5 bullet point summary of why we should vote for your party and not the DA. . .more

by voter on February 18 2013, 15:54
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MAMPHELE, RE BATLA AGANG - meaning build the south african nation
Instead of the breakers of the nation called the ANC - African National Crooks.

by Finish and Klaar, Nhlanhla Kubu on February 18 2013, 16:51
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@empowering the people to govern
Frederick van Zyl Slabbert did the homework for us on the Electoral process. We have to stand together to make it happen. People need to be held accountable. Better to strive for something better than drown in wrist slitting nit picking. She's not this . .more

by shiksa on February 18 2013, 17:22
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Lyndall Bell- STFU Cyber Thug
All you do is spam this Site with your baseless rethoric.

by Ty on February 18 2013, 18:27
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MR's new party.
So, now we have it, another party on the ballot paper, and guess what, her parties name will appear before that of the ANC. Is that by design perhaps. Surveys have shown that when it comes to voting, the greater percentage of voters only look at the first . .more

by The Patriot. on February 18 2013, 19:09
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Reply to James Myburg
OK - I will move sites and lodge your e-mail as explanation of how I offended Bullard and got banned/censored

by Lyndall Beddy on February 18 2013, 19:13
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Further Reply to James Myburgh
You won't break through thousands of years of patriarchy, bigotry and indoctrination with kidgloves - and, of course, many people will get offended.

And, in my opinion, the ANC has been in "secret service/spy" mode for so long they have . .more

by Lyndall Beddy on February 18 2013, 19:32
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@Lyndall Beddy
My point is that the majority of South Africans (living today) didn't vote in 1994, they were like me too young, or they weren't even born. I couldn't care less for the unfilled promise of those in 1994; I care about the future of South Africa and I . .more

by South One on February 18 2013, 21:06
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@The Patriot
I agree it is very surprising that Dr Ramphele did not come to the market with more of a complete package today, but perhaps she has in mind a rolling launch to build publicity and awareness before the 'full' launch and details. It is essential now for . .more

by Paul Whelan on February 18 2013, 21:28
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@voter
Agreed you are spot on. Perhaps she is new to the minefield of politics. That hat was not smart. Perhaps she is used to getting her own way? Maybe her past has helped her more than her ability? Who knows but for me she is a better bet than the DA . .more

by No longer DA on February 18 2013, 22:25
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Jury still out but image consultant definitely needed
On hearing that "voice" on TV this evening I immediately identified, under some extraordinarily disobedient headgear, Mamphela Ramphele. I don't know where this "Agang" is heading, but the pessimist in me overruled the optimist (again). First impression: . .more

by Argus Eye on February 18 2013, 23:01
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goal number one....
that Paul Whelan will either p!ss or get off the pot.
has he ever made a positive decision in his life i.e. one that shows some spine or desire to actually create something that moves?
He appears to be the stereotype three handed man.
On the . .more

by millenium goal on February 18 2013, 23:08
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dream coming true
I live in a DA run province.......WC are living the dream

by wishie on February 18 2013, 23:19
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what would happen if
what would happen if she employed strategists from overseas, for example the guy who managed Obama's campaign in 2008? I think this is why many of our parties fail, they are too wrapped up in thinking that they know exactly how to win hearts and minds . .more

by multi851 on February 18 2013, 23:54
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@Multi851....what would happen IF.....?....
...."she employed strategists from overseas ?", you ask.

Who says she isn't ?

That US$20million has come out of somebody's deep pockets..... and regime change costs a bit more than US$20m these days.

So, unless the mystery . .more

by John Austin on February 19 2013, 01:10
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Wow! What a courageous and accurate analysis of how the dream has been defiled!

Madam, most South Africans of whatever colour or creed will endorse your sentiments on how the dream and enthusiasm we had for reform in 1994 has all but been snuffed out by the avaricious self-serving ANC.

We all had goose bumps and . .more

by Mute Fool on February 19 2013, 01:17
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Check your facts and ur spelling
What are you smoking Lynn me boy? Before The 90's it was the law that the English exported to the Colonies old chap! The Yanks et al just made it legal. End of lesson.

by Beddy Bee on February 19 2013, 05:05
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@Mute Fool
I'm sure many SAns of all colours will endorse what you say, but it is the real, ruthless world of politics Dr R is entering now and, though it's an essential start, she is going to need a great deal more than a dream to win through.

Good luck. . .more

by Paul Whelan on February 19 2013, 06:45
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@ Stephan
Agree 100% Stephan...

by wendy on February 19 2013, 07:15
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Eish
You also invited us in 1994 to rebuild the country after appartheid. Look what you have done with it in the past 18 years. You voted for the ANC during the last general election and has since reached your end of shelf live and want to return to the gravy . .more

by Pieter on February 19 2013, 07:32
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Who cares 2
Perfect Pleb. I couldn't put in better.

by Pieter on February 19 2013, 07:34
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This is better...
This makes for a better State of the Nation Address than was presented by Zuma 5 days ago.
It is also more honest.
Remember, for instance, what Zuma said about labour relations in the mining sector being 'on track'.
No, the ANC is . .more

by Paul C on February 19 2013, 08:17
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South African dream
South African dreams is unity,freedom forever and be rich. Mamphela Ramphele you late , listening on something that is expected. Try your best maybe you'll get the support from your people.

by khabs on February 19 2013, 08:25
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Yet another new party...yet a new bunch of thieves.
"We have seriously under-estimated what it would take to walk the journey from being subjects of undemocratic governments, denied the right to make our own choices, to become citizens of a constitutional democracy, reclaiming control over our lives. We . .more

by Wolf on February 19 2013, 08:47
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Between the lines
Now that the AA universe has stopped dishing out sinecures the only remaining option is politics? Whatever happened to a dignified retirement?

by Reader on February 19 2013, 08:53
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Lyndall Beddy, is'nt it strange how certain race-types in our country clutch
at straws, any straw, in their effort to overturn black majority rule in SA? Their media-inspired frenzy deprived them of the ability to think straight. They will support any leader who oppose the ANC. They intentionaly evade the hard questions while . .more

by Patrick Sekoe on February 19 2013, 09:21
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@Beddy and Patrick Sekoe
Lyndall : Zuma prosecuting corruption? Don't be fooled; maybe the Zuma Government is settling scores with Mbekiites, but its President is the Corrupter in Chief, he having had more than R250million of taxpayers' money spent on his private property, and . .more

by Mute Fool on February 19 2013, 09:54
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No, you are wrong.
You are wrong, Patrick Sekoe.
The ANC is no longer the strong bull, but the weak rodent.
The people of South Africa, of all races are fed up with the splutterings of the ANC and are ready for change.
They can no longer trust the ANC because . .more

by Paul C on February 19 2013, 09:59
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Dr R on SAFM
Having had some fun earlier about Dr R's ill-advised headgear, I think I'd better be nice to her. The DA has several times rejected my applications for positions (too white?) in its structures. Perhaps Dr R's Agang might offer me a job ( a paid one, not a . .more

by Argus Eye on February 19 2013, 10:11
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The program for a new Africa ( AFRICOM )
@Lyndall

"THIS IS NOT AMERICA!"

Perhaps the 20mill US$ .... IS ?

Citibank & George Soros ?


by Bibliophile on February 19 2013, 11:04
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@mute fool,
Are you therefore aware of the fact that the majority of voters in SA are black and as such are now the ruling class? When i accuses you, note your definition as 'us'' thereby justifying my classification,of trying to overturn black majority rule, i . .more

by Patrick Sekoe on February 19 2013, 11:43
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Uneasy lies the head that wears the Crown
Especially amongst the Zulu

and then
They get rid of the rest of the pretenders

http://users.tinyonline.co.uk/gswithenbank/killword.htm

Yimpi Yabantwana

Do you really know much about the history of social . .more

by Bibliophile on February 19 2013, 11:44
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Dr R
Has anything good come out of Limpopo? Dr R for starters change your headgear and a political party called Agang - how appropriate another gang hoping to get rich quick

by Gladys on February 19 2013, 12:05
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HOPE.....dashed.....the BEDDY-Biddy is still with us.....
@Reply to James Myburg
OK - I will move sites and lodge your e-mail as explanation of how I offended Bullard and got banned/censored

by Lyndall Beddy on February 18 2013, 19:13

So, what went wrong, Lyndall ? Why are you STILL on . .more

by John Austin on February 19 2013, 12:18
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Gladys
The news of the formation of a new political party has been in the public domain for some time now. It was supported by respected academics. While the political system of democracy allows for the proliferation of political parties, I am of the firm view . .more

by Patrick Sekoe on February 19 2013, 12:31
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@ John Austin
They stopped blocking my comments and let them through.

by Lyndall Beddy on February 19 2013, 12:44
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Lyndall Beddy, MR held prominent positions at the World Bank and Goldfields
These companies are at the apex of global capital's objective of destroying the unions and thereby creating more profit. Yet, yesterday she talked about our ''legacy of eclusionary economic and political systems that continue to characterise the primary . .more

by Patrick Sekoe on February 19 2013, 13:44
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@LYNDALL- "They stopped blocking my comments & let them through"...

NEVERTHELESS, it was YOU, Lyndall, who wrote "I will move sites".....

....but you haven't.

The fact that "they" have stopped blocking you doesn't negate your undertaking to "move sites". Matbe "they" stopped blocking you because . .more

by John Austin on February 19 2013, 14:38
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Tough Luck
@ John Austin

You may not have understood me but they did! I am adamant that the right of reply should not ever be denied - considering how I fought that for years.

by Lyndall Beddy on February 19 2013, 15:17
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@LYNDALL....oh yes, I fully understand.....

.....so does everyone's "right" to reply trump their "responsibility" as to how they excercise that right when delivering it ?

It isn't what you write that offends virtually everyone who comes across it, its your delivery . .more

by John Austin on February 19 2013, 15:32
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Even Thoughtleader has got the point - AFTER 8 years!
@ John Austin

NOW they delete my comments BEFORE a conversation starts which might go down contraversial paths, which is annoying but NOT infuriating.

IT is the Basic Rule of a Free Press - the Right of Reply! THERE IS A DIFFERENCE . .more

by Lyndall Beddy on February 19 2013, 16:09
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@John & Lyndall
Niyafunana yini? What the hell is going through your minds? We should be commenting about this new party and what it promises to bring but what....kiddy business

by Hhay sukani mani!!!!!!!!!!!! on February 19 2013, 17:01
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I have to reply to his questions
@ Hhay

Both John Austin and Dot do this kind of thing all the time - and then accuse everyone else of being off topic!

by Lyndall Beddy on February 19 2013, 17:47
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Yes, LYNDALL, but....AGAIN....

....you choose to totally miss (or side-step) the point.... as you always do (which is more than annoying, perhaps even INFURIATING).

Nobody questions the RIGHT TO REPLY RULE - so you YOU don't need to hide behind that rule, nor wave it at . .more

by John Austin on February 19 2013, 17:58
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@by Lyndall Beddy on February 19 2013, 17:47
You chose to drag me into this...not wise...not wise at all...

1- Provide a hyperlinked example to what you accuse me of. Just 1...


by . on February 19 2013, 18:38
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@John & Lyndall.... (and now @Dot)....
@by Hhay sukani mani!!!!!!!!!!!! on February 19 2013, 17:01

You write: "We should be commenting about this new party and what it promises to bring....", and we were - well most of us - until the Beddy Biddy hijacked the blog with her staccato . .more

by John Austin on February 19 2013, 19:16
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Mamps
can we have this speech in xhosa?

by kev on February 20 2013, 06:10
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Kev, even a Xhosa translation will not convince me that Mumpy Rumpy is
the genuine article or not a descendant of the failed 1996 Class project.

by Patrick Sekoe on February 20 2013, 13:38
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How more democratic
Leave her alone- everyone has a right to make a bloody fool of him/herself. My dear sister good luck. i once made a fool out of myself, so did Mosioua Lekota, de Klerk and many others. Ignore all of them.

Go enjoy yourself in beeing a fool.

by Agang's Mamps on March 15 2013, 14:08
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